24th May 2018
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Huge crane vessel in Lerwick for a week

1 comment, , by , in News

One of the largest crane vessels in the world arrived in Lerwick Harbour today after working on the Clair Ridge project 75km west of Shetland.

Thialf had been involved in installing “jackets”, or platform legs, at the developing oil field on behalf of BP. Each of the jackets weighs in at roughly 22,000 tonnes and the platform’s “huge capability” was needed to install them.

BP spokesman Matt Taylor told The Shetland Times the vessel was stopping in Lerwick for a crew change and minor repairs before embarking back to the oil field to install the second of the jackets. Thialf is expected to be staying in Lerwick for a week.

 The tanker Ow Atlantic passes the Bressay lighthouse on the way into Lerwick Harbour on Monday. In the background is the semi-submersible crane vessel Thialf, which can lift a massive 14,200 tonnes. Photo: Charlie Umphray

The tanker Ow Atlantic passes the Bressay lighthouse on the way into Lerwick Harbour on Monday. In the background is the semi-submersible crane vessel Thialf, which can lift a massive 14,200 tonnes. Photo: Charlie Umphray

The Clair Ridge project which the Thialf is working on is the second phase of development for the Clair oil field, which targets the area to the immediate north of the existing field. BP recently invested £4.5 billion into the development, which could potentially yield 640 million barrels of oil.

Gas and oil produced from the project is set to be taken to the BP oil terminal in Sullom Voe for processing.

The Thialf is home to two 144 metre cranes which tower above the ship. In addition to the cranes, the ship holds 736 berths and is capable of performing numerous tasks within the oil industry – from foundation laying to installing pipelines.

Iwan MacBride

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One comment

  1. David Ross

    Great Photo Charlie Umphray, and Great Story, ( sorry don’t know if that story was from you Charlie), but wish we had got a copy of it in Edinburgh, You don’t see these every day in Scottish waters, and when I was at Sea in the 1970s (early), the heavies Sea Ship Lift we had was on a Benline Ship, 350 Ton’s. BenWyvis.

    Reply

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