Scots are not so stupid (Donald J. Morrison)

I am sure that most of you have heard more than enough about the scaremongering and that an independent Scotland would not qualifying for a EU rebate etc, should we gain independence.

A “yes” vote at the referendum  would automatically nullify the rUK rebate. Their bargaining agreement of the Scottish fishing industry would become null and void and outwith their jurisdiction.

Many of your readers will recall how former UK Tory PM Ted Heath sold the Scottish fishing down “the river” to gain the UK rebate exemption by giving away one of of our country’s main lucrative industies.

Heath considered the Scottish fishing industry as expendable. An independent Scotland would be able to enter into fresh negotiations with the EU but I very much doubt if the Scottish fishing industry would be on the table.

This negligence may very well come back to haunt the Westminster government who consider the whingeing Scots as too poor and too stupid and unable to run our own rich nation.

Donald J. Morrison
20 Haig Street,
Portknockie,
Buckie.

7 comments

  1. Andrew Jennings

    An excellent point. The No brigade seem to imagine that a renegotiation of EU treaties is necessarily a bad thing for Scotland and that only a big, beefy UK can persuade Brussels to accede to demands. This is nonsense. Malta gained a permanent derogation of an EU regulation allowing them to restrict the purchase of second homes on the island. Malta is not reknowed for its muscle. The potential for a newly independent Scotland to reshape its relationship with the EU is a tantalising one and should not be missed.

    Reply
  2. Ali Inkster

    So the fishing is on the table in any negotiations and I don’t think the Eu countries will agree to less access and as it is Salmonds only bargaining chip to ensure his snout stays firmly in the Euro trough, there will be even more misery for our fishing industry.

    Reply
  3. Gordon Harmer

    An independent Scotland would be “forced” by Europe to apply VAT on a whole range of products which are currently exempt from the charge.
    It is said that would leave an independent Scotland facing a “massive tax bombshell” which would impact on both businesses and families across the country.

    Alex Salmond has been challenged to “tell us fairly and squarely” what VAT rates would be charged on those items which currently have a zero VAT rate.
    This came to light after a letter from Donato Raponi, the head of the VAT unit at the European Commission, said that member states of the European Union (EU) “must apply” EU rules on VAT.

    The UK government said the UK could apply zero VAT rates on 54 areas because of a long-standing agreement with Europe.
    That means shoppers here do not pay the charge on items such as newspapers, books, some foods, equipment for the disabled and children’s clothes.

    These would all be more expensive if Scotland was independent, as VAT could be levied on them.
    This is a massive tax bombshell which will have a huge impact on business and industry in a separate Scotland.”

    There are claims parts of the construction sector, such as shipbuilding and aircraft repair, would also lose the right to 0% VAT.
    In his letter, Mr Raponi stated that under current EU VAT rules, member states “are obliged to apply a standards rate of at least 15%” for the charge, and may also fix “one or two reduced rates” of no lower than 5%.

    He added the issue of VAT rates could be considered when countries were negotiating membership of the EU.
    Mr Raponi said: “New member states usually negotiate and obtain some specific derogations, but limited in scope and in time. Once the accession Treaty is agreed along with any VAT derogations, it is no longer possible for a member state to introduce special VAT rates.”

    But he stressed: “The member state must apply the EU rules.”
    Here is another undisclosed and potential cost of independence that has been exposed”.
    We know that within the UK families don’t have to pay VAT on vital items such as books or children’s clothes.

    “The European Commission has now confirmed that, as a new member, an independent Scotland would be forced to give up those hard-won tax breaks which help ordinary families every year.
    “That means a minimum 5% increase on thousands of goods. No ifs, no buts – those are the rules for any new member.”

    Thousands of people in Scotland are employed across the construction sector in areas like shipbuilding and aircraft repair – areas which benefit enormously from VAT exemption and would be hit hard by such tax breaks being taken away under independence.”

    None of this has been spelled out by the SNP and I bet the first comment to contradict the above will have the word scaremongering in it.

    Reply
  4. Joe Johnson

    Has anyone noticed that the yes campaign always resort to childish name calling like “Scaremongering, scaremongerer, fear factor, project fear, Westminster regime” etc. Alex Salmond has obviously not thought this through. first he said Scotland would automatically get into the E.U now we are told that is not possible as Scotland would have to apply like any other newly independent country. He said Scotland could keep the pound and we are told this is not possible. Even if Scotland kept the pound they would have to let England have control over it as mentioned by the governor of the bank of England (who is Canadian). who can forget the SNP’s u turn over its nuclear policy. Because they found out that Scotland would not be able to join NATO. I’m voting no this September. I’m a proud Scotsman and proud of my country but also proud to be British. Definitely better together.

    Reply
  5. Harry Dent

    “He said Scotland could keep the pound and we are told this is not possible.”

    But who is telling us it’s “not possible”?

    Well, er, the no campaign in the shape of that bastion of truth, decency, and honesty Gideon Osborne.

    Sterling is as much Scottish as it is English and, given that much of its stength comes from oil, perhaps the question should be, “Can the UK keep the pound after Scottish independence?”

    Reply
    • Robert Duncan

      That Scotland can “keep the pound” isn’t even remotely up for debate. The question is whether we can do so within a formal currency union with the rest of the UK.

      It’s very important to maintain the distinction as too many people seem confused by this.

      Reply
  6. iantinkler

    Salmond and the Nats will do all they can to alienate The Scottish people against Cameron, Heath, Thatcher, the Tories (vile!!) and Westminster. Paradoxically the very people he is trying to influence are far too bright, proud and dare I say noble to be taken in by such a xenophobic and unpleasant tactic. Perhaps the greatest ally the better together have is Salmond and his Nats. Keep it up boys and girls, schools not over yet! Lol.

    Reply

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