21st May 2018
Established 1872. Online since 1996.

Are we not amused? (Andy Holt)

When Jonathan Wills refers to the UK government dragging “Scotshire” out of the EU as the result of the referendum against “our” will, is he using the royal “we”, as in Queen Victoria’s “we are not amused?”

If not, methinks he presumes to know the thoughts of all of us while producing no evidence to support his impudent assertion.

One doesn’t need to be a Ukip supporter to wish us free from the shackles of the European Commission and the dead hand of its bureaucrats.

Andy Holt
North House,
Papa Stour.

2 comments

  1. Steven Jarmson

    Well said Andy.
    One of the reasons I voted no in the referendum was because when I emailed the yip campaign asking if there would be referendum on Scottish members of the EU the reply I was “Scotland will be a continuing member of the EU.” I replied and said will there be referendum on the subject and the reply I got was “Scotland will be a continuing member of the EU.” I asked again for the third and final time, I said I’m not in favour of EU membership, so will I get a say on the subject? The reply was “Scotland will be a continuing member of the EU.”
    I took it that the Indy people only believe in democracy when it suits them.
    I was a firm no prior to this email exchange, but this sealed it. I want a referendum and remaining within the UK will deliver that…even if does mean the Tories need to win, I’m not a fan of the Tories, but needs must.

    Reply
  2. David Spence

    Steven, I suspect that one of the main reasons why the Tories, and especially UKIP, want out of the EU, is for one reason, and one reason only. This is to have complete and utter control of the United Kingdom (including forcing Scotland to be part of the United Kingdom for eternity without any get out clause) without being answerable to the European Human Rights Act.

    Economically speaking, 65% of trade is done within the EU, and as far as I am aware, most businesses in the United Kingdom want to be part of the EU for obvious reasons in terms of international trade etc etc.

    UKIP, like the vile Tories, would instantly privatise every state run service without asking the people of the countries whether they would prefer such a drastic change, especially in relation to the cost of living, which would most definitely go up quite a bit.

    As said, I can guarantee if this was the case, the cost of living (based on providing a more poorer service and being charged considerably more (due to running the business at the minimum cost (no investment, the present private water and sewerage industry being a good example)) and charging well over the odds due to the greed factor, dreaded shareholders and profits) would go up immensely, services provided would be worse for the majority of people, and we would have a 2 tier (if not more) system where one provides for the rich and well off, the other for everybody else. The social gap and inequalities would be highly significantly different, the gap between the well off and poor would be wider (in fact, at the present moment, it is the widest it has ever been) and society, as a whole, would be worse off.

    Remember, the vile Tories and UKIP, are like most capitalists, and are only thinking of themselves and what they can gain from the privatisation all state services from a commercial point of view and nothing else. As said, capitalism, as a whole, is a selfish, greedy and couldn’t careless about anything creature (banks as an example) to which we are being forced to feed more and more without any positive comeback. It leaves society in a state where, prior to the industrial revolution, it is the minority who have complete control in every aspect of our lives and there is nothing we can do about it.

    Reply

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