23rd November 2017

WATCH: Weather holds off for Remembrance Day service in Lerwick

The wreath-laying party line up in front of the war memorial. Photo: Dave Donaldson

Despite the imminent hail showers an excellent turnout attended the Remembrance Sunday service at the Lerwick War Memorial.

The sun was shining as the colour parade mustered at Fort Charlotte as normal before marching to the town hall, with the Lerwick Legion Pipe Band at the forefront.

The Rev Tom McIntyre and Lord Lieutenant Bobby Hunter lead the party from Lerwick Town Hall. Photo: Dave Donaldson

The service was led by the Rev Tom McIntyre who began with a short prayer, remembering the Shetlanders who died at the Battle of Arras in 1917.

Following the playing of The Last Post by a bugler from the Lerwick Brass Band, two minutes’ silence was observed before the bugler played The Reveille.

Mr McIntyre signalled the wreath-laying ceremony and as a lone piper played the Piper’s Lament, Lord Lieutenant Bobby Hunter placed the first wreath.

Mr Hunter was followed Shetland Islands Council deputy convener Beatrice Wishart, then representatives from organisations including the Royal British Legion, the Lovat Scouts Association, the Royal Air Force Association, the Merchant Navy Assocation and the Royal Artillery.

Next came HM Coastguard, Police Scotland, the Seamen’s Mission, the Salvation Army, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, the British Red Cross, the RVS, the Shetland Independent Cadet Battery, youth organisations and the Anderson High School.

The National Anthem was played by the brass band while the colours were lowered, and after the benediction and blessing from Mr McIntyre, the hail began as the pipe band led the procession to St Columba’s Church.

About Jim Tait

Jim Tait is news editor at The Shetland Times.

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2 comments

  1. David Spence

    It is only right and proper we remember those of gave their lives in order we can have the lives we have today.

    However, should we not also question why so many lives were taken, and for who would benefit from such a sacrifice?

    We remember the dead, but we do not question why they died in the first place? Do we really serve for the greater good of ourselves or for those who are in power?

    Is giving ones life the only purpose of the ultimate sacrifice of going to war/conflict in which to serve those who do not shed a tear for us but we are expected to give our life for them?

    I am sure many people may say this is disrespectful, but it is not the death I am questioning, it is the cause of death which should be scrutinised and most certainly questioned.

    Even today, in foreign lands, we still submit to those who prefer us to look after their interests without question?

    This, war and conflict, will become more prevalent once the powers of Brexs*it really take hold.

    Reply
  2. Haydn Gear

    David Spence touches an issue which I’m sure people share. Do people ever willingly leave their loved ones behind and happily skip off to risk their lives and all too often lose them? I doubt it. Were German soldiers really eager to fight and end up dead? Most unlikely. ALL forces act on the orders of politicians and despots whilst the better judgements of peace loving populations are ignored. Remember the posters which said “ don’t attack Iraq”? In spite of that B and B went ahead. The true weapons of mass destruction are human beings not bombs. Incidentally, the first minute of the remembrance silence is for those who came home injured, maimed and destined to lead the rest of their lives in perpetual pain and suffering.The second minute is for those who didn’t return. King George V decreed this.

    Reply

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