19th November 2018
Established 1872. Online since 1996.

Views from the Scord 27.06.08

, by , in Features

Angling news

The Scalloway Boating Club Angling section had two competitions this weekend. The first, on Friday night, was the Ian Umphray Memorial Eela with only coalfish, pollack and mackerel counting toward landed weights. Ten anglers took part for a total catch of 92lb. In the men’s competition Ryan Jones came out top with a total catch of 33lb, closely followed by Trevor Shewan at 31.8lb and Brian Smith in third place with 14.6lb. The junior section was won by Liam Fullerton with 13lb landed. There were no ladies competing in the event.

The Three Species JS & SP Trophy competition was held on Saturday, in which competitors fish for cod, whiting and haddock. Eight anglers took part for a total catch of 180lb of fish. Jimmy Reid won the men’s competition with 54.2lb weighed-in; Mark Laurenson was second with 24lb and Alistair Fullerton third with 21.6lb. Kathryn Fullerton won the ladies section with 19.4lb. Scott Sandison took first place in the juniors with 22.2lb ahead of Brian McCaffrey with 13.4lb.

Harbour activity

Fish landings were up again with local boats Alison Kay, Quiet Waters, Venture, Fertile and Comrades landing 902 boxes in the week to Friday. News came through at the weekend that the historic vessel MK Andholmen had completed her onward trip via Orkney and was now safely back in Norway. The Anglian Sovereign called in for fuel and a crew change on Monday, as did the standby vessel Grampian Conquest. The Grampian Frontier called in for her regular crew change and supplies on Wednesday, the slurry tanker Hordafor II called in for a load of salmon silage from the Scottish Sea Farms Factory at Blacksness. The Panama registered chase boat Timor II returned to Scalloway for crewing and supplies on Thursday and the Aqua Boy also lay in for shelter and repairs. Friday saw the freight coaster Eidvaag Marin call in with salmon feed for Skretting. On Saturday the Foula ferry New Advance arrived to be lifted out of the water by crane for routine overhaul and inspection. The Ronja Settler continues to operate from Scalloway Harbour.

Local history

Scalloway woman Angela Watt is currently researching the history of Scalloway as part of her studies at the Shetland College and would like to hear from anyone willing to share their knowledge and experience of local history.

The main area of her research covers both the history and culture of Scalloway itself and that of those who have moved into and out of this area. She is particularly keen to see any early photographs or picture postcards of Scalloway as the village has changed substantially since photographic records began and she will guarantee the prompt return of any photographs provided. A main theme throughout her research is that of the sea and this may even work alongside any of the local groups that have formed in recent years to help preserve the maritime history of the local area. Scalloway has a very rich and interesting history and relatively little of it has been properly recorded and, as part of her PhD, Angela is hoping to provide a more comprehensive record. If you have any history you would like to share or know someone else who might be a source of verbal or photographic history you can contact Angela on 880573 or by email at sh042535@uhi.ac.uk

Community council

The Scalloway Community Council met on Monday night this week. Items on the agenda included the recent road alterations at Asta, as a part of an ongoing programme to allow pedestrians and cyclists safer usage of the rural single-track roads. In recent years there has been a notable increase in people jogging, cycling and walking in many areas of Shetland, a trend that has been actively encouraged by the Scottish Government.

The most relevant area for this type of leisure activity in the Scalloway ward is the Tingwall valley where, like many rural areas, the roadside verges are uneven and often not wide enough to allow a pedestrian to step off the road to allow the passage of cars, buses and trucks. This becomes a serious safety issue when vehicles are travelling at excessive speeds through the valley and people are walking with pushchairs or prams. Hence, the SIC is in co-operation with the community councils to provide flatter and wider grass verges along key areas of road that have been identified as particularly dangerous. It should be understood that these flat verges are neither designed nor intended for motor-vehicular use, although the recently improved section at Asta has already been damaged by heavy rutting to the, as yet, grassless soil. Increased vehicle usage of the Tingwall valley has led to what seems to be a poorer understanding of single-track usage with people driving over verges rather than reversing short distances to passing places or being poorly prepared to anticipate stopping and waiting for oncoming traffic. Vehicle damage to the verges is neither conducive to themes of greater public access and healthy countryside activity nor good for the maintenance of the roads and ditches.

Along with more road-related business and an assortment of other items the meeting was greatly protracted by the requirement to participate in a current consultation from the Scottish Government’s Working Group on Community Councils which seems to be examining the possibility of sweeping changes in the operation of community councils with possibilities of modernisation and greater regulation, to a national model, of local wards throughout Scotland. This may even see community council wards being combined in a similar fashion to that which has been implemented for council elections, while aiming toward greater representation of local communities. The outcome of changes such as these would seems uncertain in Shetland, where community councils already appear to fulfil their statutory requirements adequately. The extensive questionnaire is passed to the local Association of Community Councils to be reviewed and compiled with
those of other wards before it is returned to the Scottish Government.