18th October 2018
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NHS Shetland staff to receive lessons on communicating with public

1 comment, , by , in News

Health staff are to get lessons in how to communicate with the public when a trainer comes to Shetland next month, it was announced at a meeting of Shetland NHS Board on Tuesday.

This follows a number of complaints about the health service, either in hospital or in the community, in which staff attitude was a common theme.

In the year 2008-9 there were 16 complaints involving staff attitude, six about dental care and waiting times, two about communication, two about the admission or treatment of vulnerable elderly patients, two about the standard of care and two about discharge procedure.

The board felt that improved communication skills would be linked to patients’ acceptance of their treatment.

NHS Shetland chief executive Sandra Laurenson pointed out that not all complaints are upheld, and that independent GP practices are not obliged to give the board details of complaints against them.

Board member Joe Irvine said complaints should be encouraged, and the board agreed it was important to know what was causing dissatisfaction.

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About Rosalind Griffiths

I am a Shetland Times reporter covering news, including health stories, and features. I have been in Shetland for more than 30 years.

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One comment

  1. a.c.wiseman

    Complaining is a good thing in many ways, identifying problems and sorting them for the next guy, but the quality of the complaint and its content must be sound. NHS staff have a busy and hectic enough life without having to bow and scrape endlessly at every turn. I have always found them to be very professional and helpful. S*** happens. Sort the problems if they arise and let’s get on with it. 16 complaints in a full year is not to bad, but you are right, let’s try for zero with better communication and understanding.

    Reply

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