19th October 2018
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Mareel poised to open doors at last despite another raft of snags

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Last-minute delays with the completion certificate have again thwarted Shetland Arts’ plan to open Mareel this week for its first-ever concerts and public film screenings.

The latest frustration is due to a failure to satisfy the remaining requirements of Shetland Islands Council’s building standards team. A list of outstanding matters was issued to the arts agency on Wednesday, one of which is understood to relate to the fire alarm system.

The council’s head of planning Iain McDiarmid said yesterday he expected to receive the outstanding information from Shetland Arts “imminently”, which would clear the way for the £12 million entertainments complex to open. “As soon as we get it we will be dealing with it,” he said.

The breakthrough – if it comes – is too late for local promoter Klub Revolution which is set to lodge a compensation claim for up to £10,000 from Shetland Arts. It comes after Mareel was unable to stage what should have been the first event tomorrow – a night of hard dance music with superstar DJ Kutski.

Alan McLeod of Klub Revolution said he was “bitterly disappointed” when it was confirmed on Wednesday that the venue
was not going to be ready despite assurances given “at every juncture” by Mareel management when he was planning the event.

He has been able to relocate to the Hamnavoe Hall in Burra at considerable loss and inconvenience, he said yesterday. “It’s been a busy 12 hours and a hell of a lot of work.”

Meanwhile, it has emerged that builders DITT are still owed a six-figure sum of money by Shetland Arts which it had withheld due to a dispute over technical contractual issues. Recently an arbitrator ruled that the arts agency must hand the payment over.

The issue was not denied yesterday by DITT director Peter Tait although he declined to go into detail. But he said it had not affected preparations for opening Mareel with Shetland Arts having had control of the building for several weeks to fit it out.

Only a small amount of work remained to be done by DITT yesterday and today, he said, and the company was “keen to get
the building off our hands as quickly as possible”.

Shetland Arts director Gwilym Gibbons was not available to comment and give an update on the remaining problems as we went to press.

There is some concern that what is now scheduled as the first concert – Tuesday’s visit by US alternative country singer Devon Sproule – may have to move to the Garrison Theatre. Promoter Neil Riddell said the event would go ahead whether or not Mareel was available.

The last-minute problems and cancellations generate the kind of organisational headaches and bad publicity that Mareel and Shetland Arts do not need right now as they seek community support for the controversial £12.2 million venue and cinema.

Mr McLeod said the visit by Radio 1’s DJ Kutski had been sold to the artiste on the basis that he would be among the first to play in a prestigious brand-new venue, not in a small rural hall – although he emphasised his gratitude to the Hamnavoe hall committee for moving mountains to host his event at the last minute. He said the DJ had agreed to the transfer but some of those who had bought tickets want refunds.

“What should have been a fairly profitable gig for us which would have got us off to a good start with Mareel has now turned into a complete and utter headache.

“I can’t believe that what seem to be fairly minor faults with the building couldn’t be repaired before this weekend. The snagging list just seems to go on and on.”

It is not the first time that broken promises from Mareel have let Klub Revolution down. Last year it had to reschedule a gig by former Happy Mondays singer Shaun Ryder, switching it out of Shetland altogether.

There is a suspicion among some people that following the failure last Saturday to host a folk gig by Blazing Fiddles, the arts agency was reluctant to have a raucous rave-type event as the first-ever event in the venue.

Shetland Arts blamed “snagging” for preventing that concert, which went ahead in the Garrison as originally planned. Mr Gibbons said the building “didn’t reach practical completion”.

In its latest cancellation announcement on Wednesday, Shetland Arts apologised to ticket holders and Klub Revolution. It continued: “Full practical completion of Mareel is imminent and we expect to put tickets on sale for films and other events in the next couple of weeks. Please check the Shetland Arts website and the Shetland Box Office for updates.”

Mareel has taken over three years to build and was meant to open in spring last year. Slower progress led to a proposed completion date of April this year, which was pushed back to late May after extra work was asked for. Since then a string of delays and missed deadlines has led to mounting frustration for those eager to start enjoying the new building.

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7 comments

  1. Stewart Mack

    The saga of Mareel just grows and grows – the whole thing would be funny if it wasnt so serious and involve so much public money. Personally, and as a general overarching principal, i think its about time that officials, trustees, elected members or whoever start to be held accountable for the mess they continually get into – They might not be so keen to waste public money if there was a risk of it coming back on them. For instance, if the Mareel fails to meet its “business plan” which has been almost universally slated by all but the authors and continues to be a money pit who picks up the bill? – That’ll be us then – They might not be so keen to strike out on these follys if the bill ended up on their mats. Just a thought, welcome to Friday!

    Reply
  2. Gordon Harmer

    I say there luveys, I was kind of hoping this new Mareel thingy would be bringing a bit of cultural art to Shetland. I would love to see a bit of HMS Pinafore, Mikado or the Pirates of Penzance.

    It is the very model of a modern corrugated bin-eral ,
    I’ve seen better composted vegetable, animal, and mineral,
    I know the King of Clousta, and I quote his fights historical
    From Mareel to Viking Energy, in order categorical;
    I’m very well acquainted, too, with matters mathematical,
    I understand Mareel will go tit’s up, it’s simple and quadratical,
    About artistical theorem I’m teeming with facts of little use,
    But with many cheerful facts about the tin shed’s hypotenuse.

    I’m very good at integral and differential calculus;
    I know it’s constructed for the artistic minorityous:
    In short, in matters vegetable, animal, and mineral,
    It is the very model of a garbage can of tin-eral.

    But alas no, Dear Yoric it will be loud music and 3D films and alas our new artistic social lives will be missing something very special. ‘Being Ernest, the importance of’ the arts has been neglected here and we are getting a few pence worth of a multi million pound white elephant.

    Reply
  3. Peter Smith

    A week or so ago I saw an item on the Shetland Arts website “Changing the thinking on drinking” Starting into the article, Gwilym Gibbons stated he was confident Mareel would lead the way on this.Given the problems with alcohol in Shetland, I hoped to find some groundbreaking ideas on getting away from our booze with everything culture. I was therefore a bit baffled to read a list of measures that would reasonably be done by any licensed premises.

    All became clear however, on reading the Times today, the CINEMAS are licensed! Such a shame that a publicly funded body could not take the opportunity to introduce a positive change to the thinking on drinking.

    Would I be alone in now thinking it confirms the business plan as “sell loads of drink to subsidise everything else”

    Reply
  4. william smith

    sic same old same lose more money i do give up with them

    Reply
  5. Carl

    The same say we “pick up the bill” for the Leisure Centres which are constantly losing money?

    Double standards? Never…

    Carl Pickard

    Reply
  6. Carl

    The same way we “pick up the bill” for the Leisure Centres which are constantly losing money?

    Double standards? Never…

    Carl Pickard

    Reply
  7. ian tinkler

    Leisure Centers contribute greatly to public health. Exercise has been proven to combat depression, heart disease, diabetes and every aspect of human health. One single couch potato getting fit in a leisure center will save literally thousands of pounds in NHS costs over decades. To compare the benefits to all of leisure centers and art centers would be the act of an i!””£. Mind you Mareel’s bar may force the employment of more Liver specialists and alcohol councilors within the NHS, something positive to say about Mareel at last!

    Reply

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