21st November 2018
Established 1872. Online since 1996.

Backing for plan to postpone school closure talks

2 comments, , by , in Headlines, News

School consultations are the “symptoms and not the cause” of uncertainty over possible closures, the council leader has claimed.

Gary Robinson says a threatened budget shortfall is behind people’s fears, rather than much-dreaded talks over the future of the school estate.

Mr Robinson was speaking at today’s education and families meeting, where members agreed with recommendations to end statutory talks over Mid Yell Junior High School and the Whalsay school until at least 2017.

Future consultations over similar proposals for secondary departments at Baltasound, Aith and Sandwick were also brought to a halt.

Audrey Edwards

Audrey Edwards spoke of the “overwhelming opposition” to proposed school closures.

A report presented by quality improvement manager Audrey Edwards outlined “overwhelming opposition” to plans which could either have led to the closure of the departments or, alternatively, an end to lessons for S4 pupils.

The thinking behind the plans is to hold off on the consultations until 2017 when the new Anderson High School is built and the Shetland Learning Partnership is established.

Scottish government legislation on schools consultation means going ahead with the talks would have resulted in a five year moratorium if the council were to step back from closure. Late last year members voted against closing primary schools in Northmavine following an outcry from parents in the community.

Speaking today religious representative Martin Tregonning said he “fully endorsed” the proposals. But he was concerned that any “uncertainty” was unhealthy. He highlighted North Roe, which went through 14 years of consultation.

Mrs Edwards said a meeting had been held with the leaders of parent councils last week to discuss the proposals. Because of the weather at the time, only two could attend, but she said the mood was positive.

Mr Robinson said uncertainty over future budget allocations from the Scottish government had been the main cause of people’s fears.

“Consultations are the symptoms, not the cause, of the uncertainty we’re in,” said the political leader.

Despite surpassing a £715,000 savings target for the next financial year, with around £1.5 million of savings identified, children’s services still need to find £926,990 savings during 2016/17. Thereafter cuts of two per cent are needed in each financial year up to the end of 2019/20.

The total £3.165 million in savings is set against a backdrop of a fall in the block grant allocated by the Scottish government from £91.9 million in 2013/14 to £85.3 million in 2015/16.

One of the committee’s other religious representatives, Tom McIntyre, highlighted anxiety among teachers and staff.

“I was wondering what you can do to keep up staff morale in these circumstances,” he told Mrs Edwards. She said regular discussions were held with head teachers, who were asked to make sure all staff were informed of any potential changes.

Theo Smith wondered what impact there would be if the long-awaited high school faced further delays beyond 2017.

Vaila Wishart – "a critical time for education"

Vaila Wishart – “majority of people are not ready to accept changes to the school estate”.

Director of children’s services, Helen Budge, said a revised timeline would be brought forward in two years’ time.
Moving the motion, chairwoman Vaila Wishart insisted the authority’s education policy was still on course.

“The strategy for education remains the same. It’s quite clear to me the majority of councillors – the majority of people – are not ready to accept changes to the school estate.”

The move also means hall of residence and transport fees will be waived for pupils in their senior phase of secondary education. That should help offer young people the chance to move to other schools to access subjects. It is believed doing so will help with the running of the Shetland Learning Partnership.

The one caveat is that consultations could be introduced at an earlier stage if the council’s financial position worsens and Children’s Services is required to reconsider its plans earlier than 2017.

About Ryan Taylor

Ryan Taylor has worked as a reporter since 1995, and has been at The Shetland Times since 2007, covering a wide variety of news topics. Before then he reported for other newspapers in the Highlands, where he was raised, and in Fife, where he began his career with DC Thomson. He also has experience in broadcast journalism with Grampian Television. He has lived in Shetland since 2002, where he harbours an unhealthy interest in old cars and motorbikes.

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2 comments

  1. Alan Skinner

    I am afraid that Mr Robinson is completely deluding himself, and may be trying to delude the Shetland electorate. The panic about the school closure planning was nothing to do with “uncertainty over future budget allocations from the Scottish government”, but everything to do with the apparent determination of a small group of councillors to close schools and destroy communities, with total disregard for the wishes of the people. Their desire to balance the budget was laudable, but their methodology was execrable.
    Mr Robinson attended both a “budget consultation” meeting at Sellafirth, and a “school consultation” meeting at Mid Yell. At both meetings, he demonstrated a complete disregard for anyone’s opinion, other than his own, and a complete disinterest in consultation.
    I do wonder whether he is the right person to be our Political Leader. He is an elected representative, who should be representing the wishes of the Shetland people, not trying to mislead them.

    Alan Skinner
    New House
    Cullivoe
    Yell
    ZE2 9DD

    Reply
  2. Johan Adamson

    Does the waiving of residence and transport fees for those over 16 still at school make it unfair for those who decide to go to college at 16 instead? Do they have no accommodation and do they have to pay bus fares? Or for those who decide on apprenticeships?

    Reply

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