18th October 2018
Established 1872. Online since 1996.

Peatland project highly commended in RSPB awards

0 comments, , by , in Environment, News
Peatland Restoration Project officer Sue White receives her award. From left: naturalist, author and wildlife television presenter Chris Packham, Vattenfall project manager Adam Ezzamel, Ms White and BBC television and radio presenter and wildlife expert Euan McIlwraith.

Peatland Restoration Project officer Sue White receives her award. From left: naturalist, author and wildlife television presenter Chris Packham, Vattenfall project manager Adam Ezzamel, Ms White and BBC television and radio presenter and wildlife expert Euan McIlwraith.

The Shetland Peatland Restoration Project has been highly commended in the RSPB Nature of Scotland Awards.

The awards are about celebrating the success of those who work hard to protect Scotland’s precious natural heritage and who protect that which is under real threat. There were a total of 39 finalists across eight categories.

The Peatland Restoration Project, managed by the Shetland Amenity Trust, was nominated in the Innovation category. The winner was The James Hutton Institute for its Magic Margins project, while The Scottish Code for Conservation Translocations was also highly commended.

Peatland project co-ordinator Sue White said: “We have been taking an innovative and resourceful approach to sourcing materials and techniques for peatland restoration in Shetland by using waste materials from the aquaculture industry to build dams and stabilise bare peat.

“Not only have these techniques proved remarkably successful but we have also been able to reduce the cost and carbon footprint of the projects.

“Local contractors have been used throughout so that we now have a local skill base for peatland restoration in Shetland and local windfarm developer Viking Energy have been taking a big interest in our results.”

Carbon savings have been made several times over – through restoring degraded blanket bog, avoiding the need to freight materials to Shetland and re-use of bulky waste material from salmon farms.

About Jim Tait

Jim Tait is news editor at The Shetland Times.

View other stories by »

Your Comment

Please note, it is the policy of The Shetland Times to publish comments and letters from named individuals only. Both forename and surname are required.

Comments are moderated. Contributors must observe normal standards of decency and tolerance for the opinions of others.

The views expressed are those of contributors and not of The Shetland Times.

The Shetland Times reserves the right to decline or remove any contribution without notice or stating reason.

Comments are limited to 200 words but please email longer articles or letters to editorial@shetlandtimes.co.uk for consideration and include a daytime telephone number and your address. If emailing information in confidence please put "Not for publication" in both the subject line and at the top of the main message.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.