18th November 2018
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Anger over Trump is voiced as Sister March takes place in Lerwick

28 comments, , by , in Headlines, News

A band of around 40 folk united against Donald Trump and took part in a women’s march through the town in the name of fundamental human rights.

The rapidly-arranged demonstration took place the day after Mr Trump was inaugurated as the 45th US president.

The American election has proved a catalyst for a grassroots movement of women to assert values which they argue “the politics of fear” can only deny.

Washington DC is expected to have staged the largest of the women-led marches, walking under the Sister March banner, which have taken place around the world. But Lerwick has made its contribution to the movement, too.

The town march followed a route along the Hillhead to Scalloway Road and South Road. The demonstrators went to the Tesco roundabout and along Lochside, before heading in along Commercial Road, up Harbour Street and returning to the Hillhead.

It was organised at short notice by Hazel Adamson, of Cunningsburgh. She said Mr Trump’s election to the White House had spurred the walkers into action.

“I just feel that Donald Trump is going to cause problems throughout the world. I feel the people in America are going to be really impacted by his policies.

“I feel it’s really important to stand up and say ‘I don’t agree with this and I need to express this in some way’.”

She added the message Mr Trump had sent out about women made the march particularly important.

“I think it’s important because of the way he’s spoken about women. It sends a really bad message to younger women in particular who are living in this world that has supposed to have moved on, yet America elects a President who says such awful things.

“I don’t want younger women to look at us and say ‘why didn’t you do anything? Why didn’t you stand up and say that’s not acceptable, that’s not right?’ I want to be able to say not everybody thinks like this.”

Ayesha Huda, of Trondra, said the event had proved a particular success, especially given that it was only arranged with about a day’s notice.

“We’d been watching what had been happening in Washington and globally, and especially in London as well and throughout the UK. We’re feeling very much in Shetland that we really want to stand up and make our feelings known,” she said.

“We’re very much against this hate rhetoric, racism and xenophobia, and the people in Shetland don’t share those values.

“At the very last minute on Thursday night we decided Shetland should have its own march, too.

“It’s been very short notice, and Hazel has done the bulk of the work in terms of contacting the police, and getting the [Facebook] page organised, and we’re just delighted that so many people have turned out given that, really, it was only 24 hours notice.

“If we’d had a little bit more time to organise it, I’m sure we would have had a bigger turn-out than we have today.

“We don’t believe in this agenda of hate, and internalising everything. We are a world community. Although we might be in a small island in the North Sea, we’re very much a part of what’s happening in the rest of the world.”

Trevor Jamieson was one of the men taking part in the march.

“I do think it’s a shame that the American folk managed to elect somebody that could be said to be unfit for presidency,” he told The Shetland Times.

“I think we are living in a world of, sadly, inequality. It would be a better world if more folk were equal, and there wasn’t the discrimination that seems to abound here there and everywhere – particularly in the States at the moment.”

Scalloway resident Chelo Cadavid said it was important to make a stand, adding that what happened in America would have repercussions for the rest of the world.

“I think it’s important that we march today because this is a stand for democracy and rights.”

She said the Sister March also made a stand for immigration rights as well as gay and lesbian rights.

“Given America is quite a strong country. .. whatever America does is going to have repercussions on us somehow. When America coughs, the rest of the world has pneumonia.”

About Ryan Taylor

Ryan Taylor has worked as a reporter since 1995, and has been at The Shetland Times since 2007, covering a wide variety of news topics. Before then he reported for other newspapers in the Highlands, where he was raised, and in Fife, where he began his career with DC Thomson. He also has experience in broadcast journalism with Grampian Television. He has lived in Shetland since 2002, where he harbours an unhealthy interest in old cars and motorbikes.

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28 comments

  1. Robin Innes, California

    Thank you, Shetland, for your support during these uncertain times in the US (and worldwide). Every voice counts!

    Reply
  2. Brian Smith

    Brilliant.

    Reply
  3. David Spence

    I totally agree with the sentiments of the article.

    Donald Trump, has already showed his bully-boy tactics towards people with his golf course just south of Aberdeen, and the lengths he will go to get his own way (even, I suspect, bribing the council to see things his way…….planning, (very convenient of the council to sack the only person who opposed the planning of the golf course)).

    However, I do believe the Conservatives will greet Donald Trump with open arms, as their agenda (and the only reason why an EU Referendum was held when it was) is to take on TTIP (Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership) and nothing else. This deal will suit the Conservatives to a tee, and to justify the complete privatisation of all state run services.

    It sadly also projects what negative messages Trump is sending to the world as a whole, and would this possibly be the start of another ‘ cold war situation ‘ as more and more people protest against him and what he represents?

    I fear unsettling times are ahead in light of recent events in the USA?

    Reply
  4. Martyn neeson

    It’s amazing what the media will make people do. We will let Saudi princes into the country without batting an eyelid when we all know their views on women, but when a man who’s made bitter comments in the past gets elected into office in another country then that means must protest to it? Seems rather sad and attention seeking by many standards. Theresa may is unelected and we aren’t marching down the streets over her are we

    Reply
    • Brian Smith

      The boys writing here don’t grasp that people can march about or comment on whatever they like.

      Reply
    • Shuard Manson

      When are you organising those marches?

      Reply
  5. Kirk Wattles

    Thanks, friends.

    Reply
  6. Cheryl Wiseman

    I have to disagree, most strongly.

    This is nothing but an embarrassment, showing the gullibility of people to fall in line like sheep behind the media.

    What you were actually doing was demonstrating against honesty and democracy. Disgraceful in this day and age.

    Cheryl Wiseman

    Reply
    • Shuard Manson

      Surely demonstrating is the perfect example of democracy. Whether you like it or not.

      Reply
    • Richard Priest

      I disagree Cheryl, this is a fantastic show of support for a global cause. Well done Lerwick! And if there’s anything honest and democratic about Trump’s presidency then I’d welcome some examples as, so far, evidence of either has been in short supply from his administration. He’s a minority president with no mandate and he has shown no adherence to the truth in any form nor any consistency of thought.

      Reply
  7. Phyliss Jaffe

    Thank you Shetland! As an American and citizen of the world, we need people like you to fight against Trump’s disparagement of women, minorities and immigrants. It was reassuring to have people across the globe showing up and letting Trump know that his bigotry and isolationist policies are unacceptable. Keep marching Shetland!

    Reply
  8. David Spence

    I apologize Cheryl, but honesty with politics? Surely this must be an oxymoron? lol

    If you look at the way in which the Conservatives have run the country and compared this with their honesty, it does put a large question mark on their integrity?

    Donald Trump may have been speaking what people (in the USA) may have been thinking, but putting this into the arena of politics and the reality of carrying out what he may have said previously falls well short of the mark in terms of the impact on society, the economics and the USA’s relationship in the world. Basically, all wind and no action.

    I agree with you Cheryl, how many people have followed and supported Trump (especially Nigel Farage) based on what diatribe has come out of his mouth, but as said, once the reality of politics hits him, he will realize (just like many politicians) what is said and what you can do are two entirely different objectives, which for the best part cannot and would not be allowed to be carried out no matter what people may think.

    Reply
  9. i tinkler

    Sister March!! how sexist can you get, the bunch of hypocrites? No room for any brothers then. Trump may be ” Sexist, Racist and homophobic”, but so are most of the World religions, how about a protest there, or is that not fashionable enough for the trendy set.? Go where your pussy hats with pride, you deserve that.
    https://www.pussyhatproject.com/

    Reply
    • V Arthur

      Feminism is for everyone, not just women. Shame you can’t understand that, attitudes like yours is why this march was necessary. You were welcome to join but, please, continue with the “whataboutism”, I am sure it is very effective.

      Sorry women’s rights is too trendy for you, I just hope you aren’t relying on women’s votes come the council elections later this year, but again why bother with us women who only care about what’s fashionable amirite?

      Reply
      • ian_tinkler

        The sad thing here is Trump had the door held open for him by the Democrats. Clinton and her foundation received $Millions and Millions from Saudi Arabia. Now how about women’s rights and feminism there? Sorry if I regard my attitude as poor, I do not do hypocrisy quite as well as some. I hate all Trump spouted, but at least he was relatively honest, I lost faith in Hillary Clinton when she castigated Trump yet accepted money from the Saudis, no wonder her hollow sham was seen through.. Strange dishonest double standards there. Prancing around with a pussy hat on does little for Gay Rights and Feminism, which incidentally I support. However trendy protests I do not. As for my attitudes, you are demonstrably ignorant of those. V Arthur

  10. Patty Jeys

    We are angry too! The women and supporters of women in Utah march in Salt Lake City tomorrow for human rights, women’s rights, health care, and environmental issues, so many things that Mr. Trump works to suppress.

    This president did not win the popular vote and he is not winning the hearts of the people. Thanks to those of you in Shetland for showing your support and concern for human rights. We are working hard from this end to “wall off” the damage.
    Patty Jeys
    North Salt Lake, Utah, USA

    Reply
  11. Holly Ryan

    I am an American living in Minnesota but I love the Shetlands and have visited four times, so I sometimes go online to read The Shetland Times just to see what’s cooking in your neck of the woods (how’s that for good American slang?). I was so touched by the 40 of you who organized a march in response to your feelings about the inauguration of Mr. Trump. I sent a copy of this article to friends to welcome them home after they marched that day too with 90,000 others in St. Paul, Minnesota. I can’t tell you how much it means to us to feel less alone in our distress. Half of my country is traumatized by what the other half was willing to vote for to be our president. I wish I could thank every one of the 40 of you in person. You did make a difference.

    Reply
  12. Joshua Fraser

    Completely agree. The public voted, maybe people should use their efforts to educate themselves on democracy.

    Reply
    • David Spence

      eeehhh Joshua, if the US Election was based on the popular vote, Hilary Clinton would have been President (and the USA’s first woman President………mind you, our first woman Prime minister is definitely nothing to shout about lol). How and why the US uses an Electoral College System to determine who gets into the Whitehouse must be looked into more or to change the system so it represents a fairer choice as to who actually wins the election.

      Reply
  13. Joshua Fraser

    I mean I completely agree it is a waste of time. On so many levels.

    Reply
  14. John Inkster

    I think we should wait and see what he actually does as president before getting the boots on and marching round Lerwick. He may well do a poor job but I think we should give him a chance.

    Reply
  15. Haydn Gear

    Give Trump a chance to possibly do a poor job ? In that case, having run marathons, including London, I in my advanced years want to be given a chance to run the legs off all those super Africans and break the world record in the process. Like him, I may well be in the minority (USA voters) but so what ?

    Reply
    • David Spence

      Don’t you mean run circles around the African runners, Haydn ? lol

      Reply
  16. Haydn Gear

    No David ! If I were to run circles around the Africans I’d end up going in excess of 26 miles 385 yards and believe me, that’s always been far enough for me ! By the time ordinary mortals finish the distance the Africans could do a lap of honour and still finish in a creditable time .Amazing athletes.

    Reply
  17. Tyra Weis

    Thank you Shetland for standing with others worldwide to peacefully demonstrate America’s 45th President. He has shown on a daily basis his unfitness to serve others and represent our country. Hope to return to Shetland sometime, enjoyed your people, your spirit and your history, UHA was a blast!! Well done.

    Reply

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