19th December 2018
Established 1872. Online since 1996.

Mason helps beat the Monday Blues

A surprisingly healthy crowd gathered at Lerwick’s Royal British Legion for a Monday night concert.

They were there to see one of the originators of the modern trend for “singer-songwriters” – American Willy Mason, not Willie Manson as you might think.

Willy Mason delivers the goods at the Lerwick Legion – even on a Monday night! Photo: Stephen Gordon

Helping him produce a laidback atmosphere as late evening sunshine peeped through the curtains were local hero Arthur Nicholson and Siobhan Wilson from Glasgow, who has previously been in Shetland with Adam Holmes, another favourite with local audiences.

First off to schmooze a relaxed audience, maybe slightly confused at being out at the very start of the week, was an unbilled Nicholson with his hits.

He explained to a quiet, chilling crowd that he didn’t mind the playing part of a gig – it was the time between songs he found the terrifying part.

We were treated to a new song Fruits of the Sea. “A rainbow in your ear as you head for the sea”, telling us to live out our lives as one big spree. This suggestion was not a difficult one to put to any Shetland audience.

Next up was Wilson, exuding niceness with a spoon of dizziness with her romantic songs and a voice as smooth as honey. Her petite stature made you think she might have even arrived in her cello case which stood at the side of the stage.

She was to use her mellow cello to great effect later when accompanying Mason. But for now she used a silver electric guitar for minimalist accompaniment to her rich vocals, unassumingly hiding behind her fringe at times.

She sang a touching version of the old pub standard I’ll Take you Home Again Kathleen and even shared a new song. “You’re stuck in the wake of a wave” was one of the lines.

After a smattering of the man himself, “Deano” Martin on the sound system, to continue the laconic mood it was time for the night’s headliner Mason.

Originally from an island on the eastern American seaboard he seemed at ease in the setting. He’s singing with a Bulgarian choir in the near future.

He told us at one stage on his home island a winter population of 14,000 swelled to 300,000 in the summer.

He opened with the classic Oh You Restless Fugitive. Many of Mason’s songs are on the dark side but with his beat up black semi-acoustic guitar complete with tremolo arm, and “beat pedal” for most of his accompaniment, his distinctive voice and delivery turn out to be very cathartic for any Monday blues.

It’s a vocal style that is gentle and powerful at the same time. He played an hour-long set which easily held the audience’s attention with songs visiting the frustrations of life and graciously gave three encores.

I first became aware of Mason’s sometimes haunting tones from a cassette inadvertently left behind by my brother after he had paid a visit home in 2003. He described Mason as “portraying a Woodie Guthrie hobo type image” and thought his performance pleasant and personable on this occasion.

Monday night is usually bingo night at the Legion. And with this event our luck was definitely in, with three consummate performers to kickstart the week.

Stephen Gordon

One comment

  1. Derek Scott Hendry

    This is a comment for referred.
    I enjoy the reviews on local gigs but hate the way that all the reports read like a court report using sir names. This started when Civico took over as editor and to my mind makes musicians sound like criminals.
    Please call my musical friends by there first name when they are referred to and leave the last name’s for the bad lads in court.
    Thanks Adam.

    Reply

Your Comment

Please note, it is the policy of The Shetland Times to publish comments and letters from named individuals only. Both forename and surname are required.

Comments are moderated. Contributors must observe normal standards of decency and tolerance for the opinions of others.

The views expressed are those of contributors and not of The Shetland Times.

The Shetland Times reserves the right to decline or remove any contribution without notice or stating reason.

Comments are limited to 200 words but please email longer articles or letters to editorial@shetlandtimes.co.uk for consideration and include a daytime telephone number and your address. If emailing information in confidence please put "Not for publication" in both the subject line and at the top of the main message.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.