19th October 2018
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Peel applies for Environmental Impact Assessment for windfarm

The company hoping to build a 12-turbine windfarm between Lerwick and Scalloway has now reached the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) stage.

Peel Wind Farms (No1) Ltd has submitted an environmental statement for the Mossy Hill Wind Farm scheme, which would have an overall generating capacity of 50MW.

As revealed by The Shetland Times a month ago, the proposal was reduced from its original 21 turbines.

The EIA was co-ordinated by energy consultants TNEI Services, which assessed: construction and operational noise; peat and carbon soils; carbon balance; socio-economics and tourism impacts; shadow flicker; hydrology and ground conditions; and in-combination effects.

Development manager Steve Snowden said the scheme evolved from the initial 21-turbine proposal, which was the basis for the EIA scoping process, to the submitted 12-turbine layout.

He said: “This final design has successfully reduced the likely effects on the local communities, sensitive bird species within and across the site and on the Shetland landscape, including the South West Mainland National Scenic Area.

“The scale of development and Shetland’s excellent wind resource mean that the windfarm is likely to save up to 118,507 tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent (tCO2e) over an anticipated 25-year lifespan.

“Renewable energy generation is set to play a vital role in securing the energy supply on Shetland and in bringing valuable economic benefits.”

“The construction process would result in both direct and indirect job creation and increased economic activity that would boost the local economy and a smaller number of long-term jobs would be created to service and maintain the windfarm.”

The environmental statement and supporting documents are available via the Shetland Island Council website under Planning Application Reference Number 2018/186/PPF and further project details and updates are also available via the Peel Energy project website: http://www.peelenergy.co.uk/mossy-hill.

Mr Snowden added: Peel has worked with TNEI on a number of our wind energy and solar projects. We rely on their expertise and experience to help us develop and deliver our infrastructure projects.”

2 comments

  1. Ann mcdougall

    Oh dear the uninterrupted beautiful views will become an eyesore, such a shame if this goes ahead.
    Why isn’t it possible to build out at sea?
    Shetland will be ruined.

    Reply
  2. David Spence

    It will be interesting to find out what the economic impact of a large scale wind farm will have on the islands, wildlife and tourism?

    Will tourists look upon Shetland and comment to other people that the natural beauty of the islands is being ruined by wind turbines, and what impact this may have in the future regarding tourism, but moreso ships full of tourists avoiding Shetland because there is nothing to see but wind turbines all over the place?

    How will this affect local trade heavily dependent on tourism during the ‘ tourist season ‘?

    What price will Shetland pay for the minority to prosper but at the cost of all other businesses suffering due to Shetlands natural beauty being defaced by wind turbines ?

    Reply

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