20th September 2019
Established 1872. Online since 1996.

Labour candidate insists Corbyn’s plan would stop ‘disastrous’ Brexit

Labour candidate for the Shetland by-election Johan Adamson has welcomed UK party leader Jeremy Corbyn’s plan to avoid a “no-deal” Brexit at all costs.

Labour Party candidate Johan Adamson.

Ms Adamson said that it was entirely legitimate for the leader of the opposition to head any future short-term government committed to extending Article 50 and calling for a fresh general election.

She welcomed the interest in the plan shown by remainers from other parties, although responding to Liberal Democrat opposition to Corbyn’s proposal, she said Liberal Democrat leader Jo Swinson should stop playing party politics at a time of national crisis and get behind the plan.

“It is so disappointing that Jo Swinson has created a problem here. She needs to forget her aversion to Corbyn and work with him to avoid the chaos of a ‘no deal’.

“The Lib Dems were flexible enough to work with the Tories in government between 2010 and 2015. They now need to show some flexibility in helping Corbyn and others to stop this disastrous no-deal Brexit.”

11 comments

  1. Peter Hamilton

    Well said Johan! The LibDems are showing their true blue austerity colours again.

    Reply
    • Mr ian Tinkler

      Peter, just what is Corbyn showing? Ultra left! so far left labour has gone, he even makes Boris look like a man of the people!!!

      Reply
  2. Martin Tregonning

    While Johan may be right that the normal convention is for the leader of the opposition to be asked to form a government if there is a vote of no confidence, these are not normal times. For a temporary national government to stop Brexit it requires the support of a number of reasonable Conservatives and all minority parties.
    The reality, whether you like it or not, is that disaffected Conservative MPs will not support a temporary govenment led by Jeremy Corbyn.
    Preventing Brexit requires a genuine, cross-party, “neutral” government, which can command support from all parties, not just automatically seeding power to Mr Corbyn as leader of the opposition.
    If Mr Corbyn can’t accept that and puts his demand to become temporary Prime Minister ahead of forming a genuine cross-party consensus, then will end up delivering Brexit.

    Reply
  3. Andrew Emmerson

    It simply comes down to this. Can Jeremy Corbyn command a majority in the house as its currently formulated? Absolutely not.

    Would a 3rd party like Harman or Ken Clarke? More likely than Corbyn. So why waste time on something that can’t work.

    Reply
  4. John M Scott

    I wouldn’t trust Jeremy Corbyn to run a Public Convenience, let alone the British Government. I live in a predominantly traditional Labour area, that voted overwhelmingly for Brexit. If and when we have a General Election, the Labour Party and the Liberal Democrats will be consigned to history.

    Reply
    • john ridland

      Well said John , The lib dems an labour are a total joke,farce, trying any scrap of spin to gain power

      Reply
  5. John Tulloch

    The question is, does Ms Adamson support the view of London Labour’ Corbyn and McDonnell that an early, second Scottish independence referendum would be acceptable, or her Scottish Labour leader, Mr Leonard’s view that it should not be allowed?

    Reply
  6. Haydn Gear

    Nobody appears to be taking much notice of John McDonnell’s avowed plans to drastically reduce the Inheritance tax threshold and redistribute assets earned by hard work and all round effort to those who haven’t lifted a finger and are happy to live off benefits. The plans to “ redistribute” wealth ( and that doesn’t mean you’d have to be wealthy in the general sense of the word) are very much wedded to what is normally called communism and we all know how that operates. Fine if you have your feet under the table in Pyongyang , Beijing or Havana or are an insider in Moscow’s Kremlin. It seems that pick pockets are waiting for their chance to vacate the Opposition benches.

    Reply
    • Peter Hamilton

      Wow! Haydn! There are still Tories who back progressive taxation. Redistribution is not communism. It widens opportunity which goes on to increase economic activity.

      There has however been something of a shift to the far-right since the LibDems sold their souls though. Why won’t they just admit the coalition was a disaster?

      Reply
    • James J Paton

      Hayden ,
      An da Tories, wi Lib Dem support 2010-15, hiv no robbed da poor tae gee tae da rich durin’a so called period ‘o austerity? Whit fantasy wirld his du been livin in dis past 9 years?

      Wi aa da restrictions still on Hoyrood – so much fur Camerson’s post Indy Ref 1 promise o Devo Max – I’d reddir gee someeen elsea chance, Green, Indepedent or SNP. Onyting bit Tory, Lib Dem ur Labour.

      Reply
    • Malcolm Henry Johnson

      Haydn.

      Most wealthy people don’t get to be like that through their own work. It happens because our economic system takes the proceeds of other people’s work and redistributes it to them. All that is being proposed is that a small portion of that wealth should be redistributed back to the people who made it in the first place.

      Your claim that our tax money is being handed out willy-nilly to people who “have never lifted a finger” is a red herring. I don’t agree with it either but it only accounts for a small portion of tax revenue. The bulk of it is used to pay for the NHS, Old Age Pensions (for people who HAVE lifted a finger), Education, The Emergency Services, Defense, Transport and a host of other things. Are you opposed to all of these?

      Incidentally, the Kremlin was taken over by free market capitalists 28 years ago and there have been no real communists there since the 1950s. When they were in power, there was no such thing as unemployment benefit. Anyone who refused to work was taken out and shot. Frankly, I’m surprised that you dislike them so much.

      Reply

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