12th December 2019
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Public art trail to run through Lerwick centre

11 comments, , by , in News, ST Online

Three contemporary artists and one art group are to create a public trail of art that will run through the centre of Lerwick.

The LOCUS art scheme, a collaboration between Shetland Arts and Living Lerwick, will see different artists exhibit “adventurous installations” in various sites to “inspire imagination and bring new footfall” to the street.

One of artist Joseph Ingleby’s structures, entitled ‘Slipstream’, at Dalmarnock Bridge.

Award-winning sculptor Joseph Ingleby, artist Kenny Hunter, visual artist David Lemm and Edinburgh-based art collective Civic Soup will all create different installations based around the key themes of ‘where we are, where we’re going and where we’ve come from’.

Work on the project is due to begin this month and will involve residents, community organisations and businesses from across Lerwick.

Shetland Arts exhibition manager Jane Matthews said that the installations will “pay homage to the industries, buildings and businesses which make the town a great place to live, work, study and visit”.

“The works installed will act as new wayfinding points, meeting places and photo opportunities for locals and visitors alike.

“In the high season and other busy events, we hope that LOCUS will become part of the visitor experience, increasing the dwell time in Lerwick town centre, encouraging spend in our local shops, cafes and restaurants.”

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11 comments

  1. Mr ian Tinkler

    Such fun, £15 million on Mareel, about £650,000 (SIX HUNDRED FIFTY THOUSAND Pounds) each and every year, gifted to Shetland Arts and what do we get for that?
    A pile of bent scaffolding in The Street called Art! What a load of pretentious nonsense!
    So sad, Scotland’s Education is so failing.
    PISA figures down every year since 2006, that is when the SNP has started to run things!
    Pisa: Performance of Scottish pupils in maths and science at a record low. The Universities results in the sciences for Scotland are even worse.
    Never mind, the contemporary Arts are putting bent scaffolding in Lerwick! Whoopie, SNP at its very best. Keep the contemporary arts financed, forget the kids, they do not vote!!!!
    Sturgeons, “The curriculum of excellence”, up my fundamental!!

    Reply
    • Peter Hamilton

      How can Ian blame Shetland Arts Trust decisions on the SNP? Anyone?

      Reply
      • John Tulloch

        Which candidate would you recommend Shetlanders vote for next Thursday, Peter?

  2. ian Tinkler

    Read Again, Peter. I was blaming the SNP for Scotlands failing education. all the emphasis on Mickey Mouse and SFA on the Sciences. Now I could go on about the SNP and Scotland’s NHS, but The Herald does that for us. “Most Scots think SNP handling NHS badly”

    Reply
  3. Peter Hamilton

    What has all this got to do with the price of public art?

    Reply
  4. David Spence

    It has been quite noticeable as soon as you put money into the equation of art, the standards of art drop considerably to the point where no one can identify what it is and what it is supposed to be?

    As an artist myself (where my art is recognised as art (mainly portraits) and not rubbish, may be I should draw or paint a few squiggles on a piece of canvas (with no direction or meaning as such)) , then give it the title ‘ The meaning of Live ‘, and ask £1,000 for it, as it is unique, contemporary, conceptual and modern. At the same time as ripping off the customer, one can get away with it because……well, the description has already been said.

    The Tait Modern or the Turner Prize, does art no justice by exibiting alleged art on the basis of shock value rather than this of geniune skill and talent.

    One has to seriously question the standards of art and whether or not economics is taking precedence over skill, talent and natural ability…………or the lack thereof.

    Reply
  5. Stuart Hannay

    The true purpose of modern art, in my opinion, echoing that of the french decadent poets, is to ‘epater les bourgeois’ meaning ‘to wind up the middle classes.’ It seems to work.

    Reply
  6. Ian TInkler

    I would love to know which class pays $120K for an overripe banana duck taped to a wall. I hate to wind up Peter but that would be the lunatic class or perhaps Shetland Arts clones.

    Reply
  7. Peter Hamilton

    Great key themes: ‘where we are, where we’re going and where we’ve come from’. These are questions of enduring relevance that may have inspired Shetland’s Picts. Can’t wait to see what they come up with.

    Reply
  8. Haydn Gear

    I suggest that it should be borne in mind that the ‘old masters’ in the world of art were young masters once. Also, the suggestion that the true purpose of art is to wind up the middle classes is blinkered nonsense. Impressionists were initially reviled by those who were self appointed critics —- which meant they knew nothing and understood even less. But, as eyes were gently prised open , it became apparent that Impressionism was great. Yes, of course there are charlatans ( in most walks of life) and the big mistake is to be too ready to condemn out of hand anything which may escape one’s comprehension. Tolerance seems to be an alien word to many whose ego seems to be dangerously over inflated. To have an informed opinion is a far cry from having an ignorant opinion fuelled by invective.

    Reply
  9. Ian TInkler

    Sadly even the “Old Masters” are vastly overvalued and often the work of counterfeiters shows the idiocy. If a counterfeit work can so easily fool “the experts” out of £millions and £millions perhaps our values placed on art are utterly misplaced. What hope can us philistines have when a copy fools the experts so well? Perhaps there is a message there somewhere.
    Just one example of so many!! https://news.artnet.com/art-world/seller-must-repay-sothebys-fake-old-master-1391008

    Reply

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